Fishing knots overview

fishing knot how to series eye hooks

fishing knot how to series eye hooks

This article has one major key purpose in mind. To help beginners and anglers tie and know the different varieties of fishing knots. Joining a hook to a line is an admirable work of ingenuity, imagination, and perfection. The result is a small, barely distinguishable lump of a line drawn up into a neat, tight roll, hiding the experience gathered over thousands of years; so it should come as no surprise that there is such a variety of knots used for this purpose.

The size of the hook, its shape, the type online, and many other details, which may at first appear irrelevant, combine to tell the expert angler whether to use one knot or another to give him a perfectly harmonious fusing of hook and line.

There are basically two types of fishing hooks: those with an eye at the end and those without, and there are different knots for each of these types. Technically speaking, fishing knots do not constitute a new category but simply a regrouping according to the use for which they are intended. As we shall see, all hook knots fall into the categories that have already been discussed: they can be classified as stopper knots, hitches, loops, etc.

For the sake of clarity, I will use large hooks and heavy rope in the illustrations in this chapter instead of the materials familiar to anglers. This will make the movements and the structure of the knots simpler to follow, but obviously a great deal of practice and subtlety of movement will be needed when working with small hooks and gut.

How to tie Knots for eye hooks

First type: This knot is quick and easy to make and is not bulky, so it can be used for small and medium-sized hooks. It will withstand sharp jerks but could give some problems if it has been used for a long time in conditions of uneven strain. For this reason, it should be tightened very well.

Method:

(1) Pass the end through the eye of the hook and take a turn around it shank. Continue by passing the end over the standing part and inserting it into the loop.

(2) Tighten the knot by holding the end securely against the hook and pulling the standing part (3).

How to tie Knots for eye hooks ( second type)

This is another compact knot which is fairly universal. It can be used with any kind of hook and any type of single line and gives an excellent grip. The knot is made around the standing part of the line and the only point of contact between line and hook is the initial turn through the eye. This is the Achilles heel of the knot as it is here that the line generally breaks. This problem can be overcome by doubling the initial turn, that is passing the end twice through the eye. This increases the reliability of the knot, but it also increases it’s bulk and so limits it’s used to hooks of a certain size.

Method:

(1) This is quite an easy knot to make. Begin by taking a simple turn with the end of the line through the eye of the hook. Continue by taking a turn over the standing part (2) to produce a loop which is then held by a series of turns (3,4). The number of turns here is up to you, although we recommend two or three at the most.

The knot is finished at this point; to tighten it, hold the hook and pull the standing part (5), leaving the end free. The knot should be pulled tight gradually and smoothly, so as not to distort its inner order. The last finished image at number 6 shows the completed knot with the end coming out in the same direction as the standing part.

How to tie knots for eye hooks (third type)

This is a beautifully symmetrical knot which offers an excellent grip. The completed or finished image 5 shows the knot formed but still loose, so you can see the nearly symmetrical formation that makes it so very secure. The only undeniable disadvantage of this knot is that it is quite unhandy to make, particularly in the final stages. To make it easier, it is better to leave the turns quite large and then trim the end after the knot has been tightened. The loss of a little of the line will be compensated for by the fact that you do not have the problems that can arise from working with very small loops.

Method:

Begin by making a loop through the eye of the hook (1). Turn the end downwards through the loop (2), then up again behind it (3), and down through it to make a figure eight (4). Make a turn through the bottom of the right loop of the eight (5) and tighten by pulling the hook and the standing part smoothly (6).

How to tie knots for eye hooks (fourth type)

This is a beautiful and universally used knot, but it is not simple to make. It is formed in two different stages: in the first, the line is wrapped around the shank of the hook; in the second the turns that have been formed are transferred from the shank to the standing part with care, so that they remain in order. The resulting knot has an excellent grip and is admirably symmetrical.

Method:

Begin by passing the end of the line through the eye of the hook and forming turns around shank (1). The number of turns is entirely discretionary, but it is not a good idea to make too many. Although many turns make the knot more attractive, they also increase its bulk without having any effect on its grip.

The next steps consist of passing the end in the opposite direction through the eye of the hook (2,3). Now transfer the right-hand turn onto the standing part(4). Continue by transferring the turns one by one onto the standing part, working from the left and passing each turn over the others (5).

Take care when you do this to keep the turns in the same order on the standing part as they were on the shank of the hook that is the turn on the far left of the hook will be on the far left of the standing part and so on until they have all been transferred. Tighten the knot by pulling both the hook and the standing part(6).

How to tie knots for eye hooks (Fifth type)

This is quite a complex knot, which can be useful for tying small anchors or very large hooks with large eyes.

Its special feature is that it is partially tied around the end of the hooks so the grip is ensured not only by passing the line through the eye but also by the turns around the shank.

Method:

Pass the end through the eye and take a full turn around the shank tucking the end (1). Then proceed to form part of the knot around the standing part and tuck the end (2); pass the end behind the standing part and insert it through the loop formed by the the turn (3); then bring it back along the shank of the hook (4).

Finish off the knot by inserting the end through the loop formed at the beginning around the shank of the hook (5). To tighten the knot, hold the end along the shank and pull on the standing part (6).

So those are the basics and the most important fishing knots any aspiring angler should know or is suppose to know. Hope you liked it.

 

 

 

https://bestgamefishing.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/blogpost-thumb4-1.jpghttps://bestgamefishing.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/blogpost-thumb4-1-150x150.jpgRobert Frostfishing knotseye hooks,fishing knotsFishing knots overview fishing knot how to series eye hooksThis article has one major key purpose in mind. To help beginners and anglers tie and know the different varieties of fishing knots. Joining a hook to a line is an admirable work of ingenuity, imagination, and perfection. The result is... Building a web of professional fly fishing techniques,product reviews , and a community of loved recreational fishing.